Browsing: Submarines

The Navy nabbed a lot of headlines again this week. Leading the way is news that subs are now officially open to women. In other career news, the active duty master chiefs list was released. The Coast Guard is holding its ground in the oil spill – and against critics. and the Army cancelled the Non-Line of Sight Launch System, which will likely have significant ramifications for the Littoral Combat Ship. Here’s seven stories in seven minutes from the past seven days that you may not have seen, but are worthy of notice:

Earlier this  month, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead visited the naval forces of India to strengthen the maritime partnership. Now, the SEALs are getting in on that action. The Indian newspaper The Telegraph reported today that the cruiser Shiloh, destroyers Chaffee and Lassen, frigate Curts, attack submarine Annapolis, two P3C Orions and a 28-member special forces team haved teamed with the Indian Navy to practice anti-submarine warfare and special operations in the 14th Malabar exercise. The United States is the only country with which India conducts large-scale naval exercises, and this is the first time we’ve sent SEALs…

The Navy nabbed a lot of headlines again this week. Leading the way is news that the Green Hornet on Thursday took to flight – the fighter jet, not the super hero. The F/A-18E/F Super Hornet was powered by a 50/50 blend of biofuel and JP-5. That same day, a U.S. military jury cleared a Navy SEAL of failing to prevent the beating of an Iraqi prisoner suspected of masterminding a 2004 attack that killed four American security contractors. Two others will soon have their day in court. And on Wednesday, the Navy implemented its first change in 17 years to…

Friday was a day when hope and history shared the same waters at Naval Submarine Base New London, in Groton, Conn. The day opened as sailors assigned to the Pre-Commissioning Unit Missouri raised colors for the first time aboard Missouri, the seventh Virginia-class attack submarine. The crew moved aboard and began bringing the sub’s systems to life. Known as “In Service Day,” the 134 officers and sailors accepted day-to-day operations of the sub, as well as its safety and security. The crew also began preparations for sea-trials, work-ups and eventual commissioning, scheduled for July 31. The same day, the attack…

The Navy nabbed a lot of headlines again this week. Leading the way is news that the Navy’s 10th San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock will be named for Rep. John Murtha – a story first reported by Scoop Deck’s own Phillip Ewing. An unfortunate T-39 crash killed four in Georgia also made headlines, as did the Thursday announcement that changes were coming to the performance evaluation system and advancement policy (check Monday’s Navy Times for more on that). And the president also reaffirmed his 2011 Afghan withdrawal plan this week.  Here’s seven stories in seven minutes from the past seven…

Scoop Deck spent an awesome morning with retired Capt. (Dr.) Don Walsh, pilot of the bathyscaphe Trieste, which recorded the deepest dive any man has made. He and Jacques Piccard on Jan. 23, 1960 dove 35,797 feet (6.8 miles) into the deepest known part of any ocean, the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench. (Navy Times has some special coverage regarding that dive in the upcoming edition.) Walsh, a submariner by trade, shared another interesting story: how he got his doctorate. The Naval Academy grad didn’t finish on the top rungs of his class. In his words, he was “officially stupid.” After…

March was a busy month for the Global Force for Good. You’ve likely heard about the commissionings, the pummeling of pirates and all the other good tidbits. Here are a few highlights that may have slipped under your radar: The carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower launched nearly 620 combat sorties and flew more than 3,600 cumulative hours from the North Arabian Sea supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. Nearly three dozen nuggets gave a collective sigh as the carrier John C. Stennis began the journey home to Bremerton, Wash., after 21 days at sea in support of fleet replacement squadron carrier qualifications. Stennis…

Fewer than 24 hours after Navy Times broke the news that a smoking ban on submarines is in the works, folks in the smokeless tobacco industry have fired up the marketing machines. First out of the gate is Smokefree Innotec, Inc., which provides “smokefree alternatives.”  Its press release offers “the world’s first totally smokefree hi-tec cigarette.” And they aren’t just blowing smoke. This cigarette-like nicotine delivery device contains the nicotine and aroma equivalent to one regular cigarette. The company hopes its product will keep the smoking lamp lit (but smokeless) for the foreseeable future. And with good reason. The military…

The crew brings New Mexico to life March 27.  (Photos by Lance M. Bacon)     NORFOLK, Va. – The Navy commissioned the world’s most advanced submarine Saturday as the $2.3 billion attack sub New Mexico was brought to life four months ahead of schedule. Scoop Deck joined the sub’s crew of 134 officers and sailors, as well as nearly 3,000 guests, family members and shipbuilders on Pier 14. Some 100 citizens from the sub’s namesake state also made the journey, and the University of New Mexico ROTC served as color guard. Rear Adm. Cecil Haney, director of the Submarine…

Scoop Deck blogger Lance M. Bacon took a day trip with Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead this week. This is the play-by-play report. 1015 We are treated to a quick review of A/C repair – a very important facet of sub life. Not only for reasons of comfort, but for the fact that the four units on a sub keep all the equipment cool. MM1 (SS) Aaron Riedel then gives us the skinny on the “Weapons Team Trainer.” This is where you learn how to fire a torpedo the right way. There’s more to it than plug and…

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