Browsing: Naval Safety Center

Let’s get straight to the point: one sailor and one Marine died during Labor Day weekend 2010, and 52 sailors and Marines were injured, some of them seriously, in motor vehicle mishaps or off-duty activities, according to the Naval Safety Center. Most, the Safety Center says, were completely preventable had proper risk management practices been followed. This annual three-day weekend begs for some party time. In its 2011 Labor Day Weekend Briefing Points, the Safety Center asks sailors and Marines to remember that if alcohol is on the menu — there won’t be many parties where it’s not, right? –…

Announcements of annual safety campaigns may for many go in one ear and out the other, but the Naval Safety Center’s summer campaign, which officially begins Memorial Day weekend, is an opportunity for Navy leaders to hit the deckplates and hammer home the message that it’s possible to have fun without taking life-threatening risks. Last summer was the Navy’s safest on record. Still, 14 sailors and 14 Marines lost their lives in motor vehicle and recreational mishaps. That was a big improvement over the five-year average of 44 total off-duty deaths each summer. But still … Leaders can find all…

Remember in the ’80s when sitcoms did Very Special episodes? Who will ever forget Jessie’s freak out when she took caffeine pills? Or the time Urkel got drunk and almost died? And don’t get Scoop Deck started on the time Brad got high, or on Uncle Ned’s drinking problem. The sailors up at the Naval Submarine School in Groton, Conn., are reliving those glory days with “Spiced.” It’s a Very Special episode that naturally features puppets named “Josh” and “Greg” and the latter’s struggle with a very real problem in today’s Navy. Spice and other designer drugs are scary stuff. And…

Officials have to be encouraged at the trend toward a safer on- and off-duty Navy, indicated by near-mid-year Naval Safety Center statistics. We type those words with a big “knock on wood,” of course. But with the fiscal year — which began Oct. 1 — nearly halfway gone, it’s looking like the Navy is shaping up, safety-wise — at least in terms of major mishaps, and on- and off-duty deaths. Check the trends for the fiscal year through March 23, referred to in the following as “at this point”: Class A afloat mishaps: two this year compared to four a…

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