Browsing: Maritime operations

As further evidence that the Geek Squad provides the best pickings for tomorrow’s Navy, we turn to the latest news out of the Naval Academy. For the Class of 2015, cyberwarfare and cybersecurity will be right up there with the traditional instruction of all things nautical. This shouldn’t come as a surprise to the latest gaggle of plebes. Most spent their elementary recess periods pecking away on a computer, so they get it. For the older salts who are scratching their heads, realize that the Navy righly recognizes cyberwarfare is arguably the greatest threat facing the modern military. This understanding…

Friday was a day when hope and history shared the same waters at Naval Submarine Base New London, in Groton, Conn. The day opened as sailors assigned to the Pre-Commissioning Unit Missouri raised colors for the first time aboard Missouri, the seventh Virginia-class attack submarine. The crew moved aboard and began bringing the sub’s systems to life. Known as “In Service Day,” the 134 officers and sailors accepted day-to-day operations of the sub, as well as its safety and security. The crew also began preparations for sea-trials, work-ups and eventual commissioning, scheduled for July 31. The same day, the attack…

The Navy nabbed a lot of headlines again this week. Leading the way is news that the Navy’s 10th San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock will be named for Rep. John Murtha – a story first reported by Scoop Deck’s own Phillip Ewing. An unfortunate T-39 crash killed four in Georgia also made headlines, as did the Thursday announcement that changes were coming to the performance evaluation system and advancement policy (check Monday’s Navy Times for more on that). And the president also reaffirmed his 2011 Afghan withdrawal plan this week.  Here’s seven stories in seven minutes from the past seven…

The Navy kicked off the month by kicking pirate butt in three foiled attacks. The stories that nabbed most other headlines this week included the Nuclear Posture Review, which was all the talk in the beltway; F-35 training, which continues despite problems getting the jets; the Fire Scout, which scored its first drug bust;  the smoking ban on subs and the Navy’s decision to restrict the wear of ball caps and coveralls. Here’s seven stories in seven minutes from the past seven days that you may not have seen, but are worthy of notice:

It seems ours is not the only Navy that must contend with shipbuilding delays. New Zealand today took possession of its offshore patrol vessel Otago – two years late. A range of issues delayed delivery, most notably the failure of both engines as the ship was about to leave on its maiden voyage. The ship limped back into port on one engine after that debacle. No doubt everyone was holding their breath (no pun intended) when the ship sailed from Melbourne earlier this week for the four-day voyage across the Tasman Sea. It’s no wonder that the New Zealand Navy…

March was a busy month for the Global Force for Good. You’ve likely heard about the commissionings, the pummeling of pirates and all the other good tidbits. Here are a few highlights that may have slipped under your radar: The carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower launched nearly 620 combat sorties and flew more than 3,600 cumulative hours from the North Arabian Sea supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. Nearly three dozen nuggets gave a collective sigh as the carrier John C. Stennis began the journey home to Bremerton, Wash., after 21 days at sea in support of fleet replacement squadron carrier qualifications. Stennis…

With a radar-guided 20mm Gatling gun spitting out 4,500 armor-piercing tungsten rounds per minute, and a 100-percent kill distance in the realm of eight miles, what’s badder than a MK15 Phalanx Close-in Weapon System? An upgraded MK15 Phalanx Close-in Weapon System. Raytheon on March 31 was awarded a $204 million to beef up 32 CIWS systems. John Eagles, a spokesman for Raytheon, today told Scoop Deck that the amount jumped by $10 million because some extra upgrades were ordered – and with good reason. The 32 existing mounts will upgrade to 1B status, which is a defense system with a…

The good people of Morgan City, La., will be hearing a lot of “Who Dat?” in the coming weeks, as dozens of Iraqi naval sailors arrive later this month to learn to operate their new patrol boats. They’ll miss Mardi Gras, but son of a gun, they’ll have big fun on the bayou! The first Iraqi Swift Boat PB 301 made its first machinery runs last week. Manufactured by Swiftships Shipbuilders LLC, the 35-foot Swift Boat achieved an average speed in excess of 34 knots (39 mph) at 84 percent installed power.   The boats also have six 30mm gun weapons systems, machine gun…

Scoop Deck blogger Lance M. Bacon just completed a 24-hour embark aboard the carrier Harry S Truman. This is the play-by-play.   Brown shirts and officers from the HS-7 Dusty Dogs prepare their Seahawks for service in anticipation of a busy day. (Photos by Lance M. Bacon) 0830 Scoop Deck is hanging out on Vulture’s Row, watching the crew ramp up for the day’s business before we catch the COD. Though we’ve spent only a few short hours with this crew, it is not hard to understand why they are back-to-back Battle E winners. These sailors and officers will soon cover…

Scoop Deck blogger Lance M. Bacon just completed a 24-hour embark aboard the carrier Harry S Truman. This is the play-by-play.  0600 Reveille, reveille! All hands heave out and trice up. Reveille!  Truman’s 65-ton rudders are cutting through some choppier waters. It makes for a gentle rocking motion that invites one to remain in the rack. But Scoop Deck has claimed one of the 18,150 meals that will be prepared aboard Truman today, and we plan to enjoy it on the enlisted mess decks. There’s no way we’re going to miss that.   Capt. Joe Clarkson has been at Truman’s…

css.php